iWOAW Announces a Social and Technological First

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Vancouver, January 28, 2013 – In partnership with PlaneFinder.net, the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) is proud to announce a social and technological first.

Thorough Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, March 4-10, 2013, the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide and PlaneFinder.net will collect the flight tracks of commercial flights operated in part by a woman in a technical capacity as well as the flight tracks of female introductory flights conducted worldwide.

The project named “Women Color The Skies” will combined the collected flight tracks to create an online animated and interactive visualization of the current involvement of women within the industry as well as the level of engagement on the part of the industry to encourage more to join.

Professional women of aviation involved in commercial flight operations in a technical capacity such pilot, air traffic controller, dispatcher, mechanic, engineer, etc. are invited to report their week’s professional activities at www.womenofaviationweek.org/contests/women-color-the-skies-challenge to see the flight tracks of their flights added to the online visualization.

One of the key highlight of the week is the mass introduction of girls and women to the sensations and magic of flight in small aircraft. The pilots who introduce girls or women to flying during the week can see their flights added to the online visualization by reporting their flights at www.womenofaviationweek.org/event/acting-individually.

According to numerous studies, perceptions that the air and space industry is for men constitute a main barrier to women’s increased participation as women fear isolation and limited growth opportunities if they choose the field. About 2% of aircraft mechanics, 6% of aircraft pilots, and less than 12% of aeronautical engineers are women.

“Using PlaneFinder.net’s exciting technology, we are hoping to help put to rest some of the justified worries many women have when considering a career in the industry,” says Mireille Goyer, Founder and President of the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide. “It is critical that women realize that other women are currently actively involved in the industry. The online interactive visualization is a concrete step towards achieving that.”

For details about the “Women Color The Skies” project, please visit: www.womenofaviationweek.org/contests/women-color-the-skies-challenge

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, held annually during the week of March 8, aims to foster diversity in aviation by celebrating history, raising awareness, and sparking vocations as thousands of girls and women are introduced to aviation through industry-wide collaboration.

The Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) is a not-for-profit consortium of businesses and organizations from around the world whose mission is to foster diversity in the air and space industry through outreach, education, and advocacy.
Pinkfroot, a leading flight tracking provider, has been providing live flight tracking apps as PlaneFinder since 2009. Pinkfroot’s culture is built around innovation, continuous improvement and high quality customer service. The female co-founder is particularly sensitive to projects empowering other women.

iWOAW Announces Its Newest Video “Women’s Questions About Flying Small Aircraft Answered”

The Institute asked girls and women what they wanted to know before going on their first small aircraft flight then answered the most common questions in this new video

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Vancouver, January 12, 2013 – March 4 to March 10, 2013 will mark the third annual Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week.

According to numerous studies, perceptions that the air and space industry is for men constitute a main barrier to women’s increased participation. About 2% of aircraft mechanics, 6% of aircraft pilots, and less than 12% of aeronautical engineers are women.

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week aims to raise awareness of the opportunities available to women in the air and space industry and awaken aviation vocations within the female population while celebrating women’s historical role in the industry by encouraging industry stakeholders to welcome girls and women to their facilities and offering them an insider view.

One of the key highlight of the week is the mass introduction of girls and women to the sensations and magic of flight in small aircraft.

While there are many videos discussing in details what to expect during the first flight lesson, the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide could not locate a video that addressed the common questions and concerns that girls and women considering to go on their first flight in a small aircraft have.

The team at the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide walked the streets of cities in several countries to ask girls and women what they wanted to know before they would feel comfortable flying in a small aircraft.

A series of common questions was tallied and pilots answered these questions in an honest and direct manner in this new 5:45 video viewable at www.YouTube.com/user/WomenOfAviation.

More than sixty events organized for Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week are in planning stages throughout North America, Europe, and Africa. More are added every day. The majority of these events include introductory flights for girls and women.

Female first flight candidates registering to participate in a Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week event at www.WomenOf AviationWeek.org will be encouraged to view the video.

“A first flight in a small aircraft is a magic and highly emotional experience,” says Mireille Goyer, Founder and President of the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide. “This video will help girls and women set aside any concern they may have and allow them to fully enjoy every second of their experience.”

Although the video was developed with the thousands of girls and women who are introduced to flying in a small aircraft annually during Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, it answers questions that most people unfamiliar with flying small aircraft have and it may be valuable to any pilot about to introduce someone to flying.

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, held annually during the week of March 8, aims to foster diversity in aviation by celebrating history, raising awareness, and sparking vocations as thousands of girls and women are introduced to aviation through industry-wide collaboration.

The Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) is a not-for-profit consortium of businesses and organizations from around the world whose mission is to foster diversity in the air and space industry through outreach, education, and advocacy.
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iWOAW Launches Contest for Girls in Science, You Are An Inventor

Young women, ages 13 to 19, from anywhere in the world, can win a conversation with real astronauts

For Immediate Release

VANCOUVER, BC, Canada — On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the first female flight in space, the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) is challenging teenage girls with the 2013 “You are an Inventor” contest.

According to Mireille Goyer, founder of the iWOAW, Valentina Tereshkova became one of the early female scientists after discovering the world of science during her preparation leading up to her flight in space in 1963, beginning by earning a doctorate in physics.

Organized by iWOAW, the 2013 “You are an Inventor” contest offers teenage girls a chance to help women astronauts explore space more comfortably.

Young women worldwide, ages 13 to 19, are encouraged to view themselves as inventors and follow the scientific process to create an invention with tangible benefits for all space explorers. Their mission is to conceive a new padding system or a new type of adjustable space suit that improves freedom of movement for tomorrow’s space explorers.

“Our message to young women is that, if they want to enjoy products that meet their needs better, they must consider being the ones inventing them,” says Goyer. “This contest is designed to awake the inventor in them, let them experience the fun of the procedure and the usefulness of the solution, and trigger their interest in scientific careers.”

Contest Entry

Entrants must submit a summary sheet about their invention, a scientific poster to present their concept, and photos or a video of their prototype in addition to participant information. The young women may work individually or in groups, with or without male or female adult supervision.

Winners will get a chance to speak with a small group of real astronauts from around the world via teleconference. The entries of all finalists will become part of a roaming exhibit to be presented at air and space museums around the world. Each entrant will receive an official Inventor Certificate including the signatures of female space scientists and astronauts from around the world.

Entries must be submitted before Feb. 8, 2013. Finalists will be announced on March 4, 2013, the first day of the 2013 Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week. The winner(s) will be announced on April 3, 2013. The conversation between the winner(s) and the astronauts will take place during the second half of April 2013.

Detailed information about entering the contest and downloadable posters are available at http://www.WomenOfAviationWeek.org/Contests/Invention/.

Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, held annually during the week of March 8, aims to foster diversity in aviation by celebrating history, raising awareness, and sparking vocations as thousands of girls and women are introduced to aviation through industry-wide collaboration.

About the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide

The Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) is a global not-for-profit consortium of businesses and organizations whose mission is to foster diversity in the air and space industry through outreach, education, and advocacy. Learn more at http://www.iwoaw.org.

The WOAW grassroots initiative becomes a global not-for-profit alliance

For Immediate Release

VANCOUVER, BC Canada — Since 2010, the Women Of Aviation Worldwide grassroots initiative has brought into focus the lack of female involvement in the air and space industry.

The flagship program of the group, Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week celebrated during the week of March 8, has enabled more than 5,000 girls and women to discover the joys of flight in small aircraft in 36 countries and on 4 continents while ensuring that outstanding Women Of Aviation, such as Raymonde de Laroche, the first woman to earn a pilot license worldwide, Harriet Quimby, the first woman to fly the English Channel in an airplane, and Hélène Dutrieu, the first woman to fly an aircraft with a passenger onboard and the first woman to pilot a seaplane, be recognized for their amazing contributions to aviation and to the advancement of women.

The initiative has doubled in size each year since 2010. A massive media campaign taking place during Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week and targeting the female population at large has attracted thousands of interested girls and women to airports.

11 to 13% of all students are females since the mid-1970s. However, the total number of women pilots today is virtually unchanged as compared to 1980, pointing to a far higher rate of failure among female candidates than among male candidates.

Since 1990, in urban areas of the Western world, working women less than 30 years old are earning higher wages than their male counterparts thanks to their higher college education success rate. Women represent an ever increasing economic force.

To continue to lead the innovation when it comes to reaching out to the female population and to begin to lead the necessary shift in the industry to better integrate women, the Women Of Aviation Worldwide grassroots group has formerly incorporated as an independent, not-for-profit, global alliance of businesses and organizations on September 10, 2012 under the name of Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) to reflect its enhanced mission.

While iWOAW will continue to grow its effective and innovative outreach initiative, it will also address the need for research and education to ensure the successful integration of women in the industry.

iWOAW is an inherently international consortium with directors residing in 3 countries and 2 continents and members from across the world.

Because the lack of women in the industry is not a ‘women’ problem but instead an industry problem, iWOAW fosters communication between all interested parties, male and female, starting at its board of directors’ level, which features a balanced number of male and female directors.

iWOAW encourages all businesses and organizations seeking the integration of women for economic and innovation reasons to join the consortium and become an actor of the shift.

“While the air and space industry is a technological leader, it has fallen behind most other industries when it comes to social advancements. It is iWOAW’s mission to lead the industry to not only catch up but also surpass other industries in that sector,” said Mireille Goyer, Founder of the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide.

The Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW) is an independent not-for-profit global alliance of businesses and organizations whose mission is to foster diversity in the air and space industry through outreach, education, and advocacy.

For more information about iWOAW’s mission and its many programs, please visit: www.iwoaw.org.